How Monty Foster’s radio career was turned back on at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center 

Monty Foster, wound patient, Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center

Our-Stories-MontyAs a popular talk show host on Kool 105.5, Monty Foster, otherwise known as “Mo” of the Mo and Sally Morning Show, never could have imagined he would one day be broadcasting from a hospital bed.

One weekend, after enjoying a day out on the boat with some friends, Mo slipped on the dock, causing him to smash his shin into the wood and fall backwards into the Loxahatchee River. Stuck in-between the boat and the dock, his friends had to pull him out, and that’s when he saw the deep gash in his shin. 

He didn’t think it was serious at first, but within a few days, his foot and leg became infected and swollen to the point where he couldn’t walk. After visiting an urgent clinic, he was instructed to see his primary care physician if the swelling didn’t subside. Two days later, Mo was surprised when his doctor informed him that his wound was serious enough to require hospitalization. He was then referred to Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center for treatment.

“I hadn’t been in the hospital for an extended period of time since I was a little kid, so I didn’t really know what to expect,” Mo says.

The medical staff at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, including Dr. Andres Suarez, an infectious disease specialist, performed an MRI, several blood tests and kept a close eye on him to make sure the antibiotics he was receiving through an IV were working to heal the infection. Dr. Gazelle Aram, a pain management physician, also monitored Mo’s condition to ensure his pain was as minimal as possible.

“The staff put my nerves at ease,” he says. “One hundred percent of the time I knew I could trust them and felt like I was in the perfect hands.”

While in the hospital, Mo decided to host his morning show remotely from his bed at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, while his wife, Sally, and coworker, TA, broadcasted from the studio. His listeners were happy to hear that his condition was improving and that he was receiving fantastic care.

After spending five days at the hospital, Mo’s infection cleared up, and he was able to go home.

“Although I was apprehensive before arriving at the hospital, my overall experience was fantastic,” he says. “Everyone, from the nursing staff, to the physicians, to the management team and environmental services, were extremely knowledgeable and friendly.”

Mo is happy to be walking on his own again. No longer is he broadcasting his morning show from a hospital bed, but from the familiar comfort of his studio.